Amazon Commerce

Amazon, Target And Walmart Fight For New Parents’ Spend

In a piece of news that likely comes as no surprise to any parent that has ever faced the possibility of going to a big box store with a tiny, easily enraged baby, the latest data suggests baby products are the most sold category of consumer packaged goods online.

That same study indicates that, in the competition to capture the dollars of the online happy new parent cohort, it is essentially broken down between three players/very usual suspects: Amazon, Target and Walmart.

All in, eCommerce accounts for 20 percent of all sales in the $30 billion baby goods industry — a tenfold increase over the 2 percent the rest of consumer packaged goods sees in online sales.

“Online sales of baby products are outcompeting all other segments of consumer packaged goods that we have surveyed over the last three years,” says TABS Analytics CEO Kurt Jetta. “Brick-and-mortar retailers with eCommerce aspirations should treat baby product sales as the front line of their battle for online success.”

When goods are measured in both online and offline sales, Walmart leads the field in sales of car seats, feeding products, diapers, formula and bath products, with 17–18 percent (Target takes 12.4–14 percent). All in, mass merchandisers capture 54–63 percent of such sales of baby products in the U.S.

When consumers go online, however, Amazon leads the field as the overall market leader (combined with subsidiary Diapers.com), owning 7.3–10.6 percent of all baby products sold in the U.S. online, while Walmart.com represents 3.7–5.8 percent of total purchases, and Target grabs 3.3–4.3 percent. Amazon, according to the data, controls about 43 percent of the online baby products market, as opposed to Walmart’s 23 percent and Target’s 18 percent.

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