Coronavirus

Uber To Provide Compensation For Drivers Affected By Coronavirus

Uber

Uber has announced that it is going to provide compensation for drivers directly affected by the coronavirus, which would include a diagnosis or being in an area of quarantine, the company said in a blog post.

“The uncertainty caused by the coronavirus is being felt across the world,” said Andrew Macdonald, senior vice president of Rides and Platform. “But we know it’s especially concerning for anyone who relies on our platform to make a living. That’s why we are providing financial assistance to anyone who drives or delivers with Uber and is diagnosed with COVID-19 or placed in individual quarantine by a public health authority. This assistance is now available worldwide. This is a moment of great challenge, but we are here to support you.”

Drivers will get financial assistance for up to 14 days, until April 6, “at which time we will reassess the situation and release a go-forward policy.”

If someone is either diagnosed with the virus, placed in quarantine by a health authority, asked to self-isolate by a doctor or public health authority or an account is restricted by Uber as a result of a connection to the virus, then they are possibly eligible for compensation.

The money will be based on average daily earnings for the past six months, and if someone has been using the platform for less than six months, earnings will be based on how much was earned between a person’s first trip and March 6.

“Every eligible driver in the U.S. will receive a minimum payment of $50, even if they have only done one trip,” the company said. “The minimum payment will differ by country.”

People who want to submit documentation can do so at a site Uber set up.

“You will be able to file a claim for financial assistance for COVID-19 up to 30 days after the date of your diagnosis or the date when your individual quarantine came into effect,” Uber said.

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