Merchant Innovation

Samsung’s New Galaxy Note 7 Expected To Feature Iris Scanning Technology

SAMSUNG
Samsung's new Galaxy Note 7 is expected to feature iris scanning technology.

Samsung’s next smartphone/tablet, the Galaxy Note 7, is expected to include an iris scanner, according to several reports on Sunday (July 17).

The new Galaxy Note 7 will feature a new biometric security feature for an iris scanner, according to a product listing on Zauba, a website that track’s India’s importing and exporting trade.

Images of the phone, which is said to be able to authenticate the user faster through its iris recognition technology than the typical fingerprint sensor currently found on most smartphones, leaked online earlier this week.

According to the information currently circulating around the web, Samsung’s new Galaxy Note 7 will allow users to hold the phone 10 to 14 inches from their face with the screen facing toward them then position the phone and their eyes so that they point directly at two circles displayed on the phone.

Then, voilà, the Galaxy Note 7 will recognize your iris pattern and unlock.

According to most reports circulating online, the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 would be the first device of its kind to feature iris scanning and recognition technology — not just for James Bond movies anymore, apparently — but Samsung believes the technology could be adapted and applied to any number of products, from laptops to digital cameras to possibly even using it to unlock doors.

“In various embodiments, the iris recognition system employs three lenses to capture the image signal and then checks the iris of the user based on the image generated, as well as other information,” Samsung wrote about its iris scanning technology in a patent request filing.

Samsung’s Galaxy Note 7 is expected to be powered by Qualcommn’s Snapdragon 821 processor in larger markets, like the U.S., and Samsung’s own proprietary processor, the Exynos 8893, in developing markets.

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