Today In Data

Today In Data: QSRs Innovate, Subscription Commerce IPOs And Digital Currencies

Today in PYMNTS’ data, the quick service restaurant (QSR) industry is growing and adopting new technology, customers are starting to wonder how they can spend their cryptocurrency at brick-and-mortar stores, more than half of surveyed fast food chains have yet to implement business-boosting technological advancements, subscription commerce sees disappointing initial public offerings (IPOs) followed by impressive rebounds and airline flight woes impact fewer people than one might think — but with bigger repercussions.

 

Here are the numbers:

$230 million | Value of the QSR space, an industry known for getting its customers their food fast and becoming increasingly known for its innovations in technology and automation.

$11,000 | Current price of a single bitcoin, with cryptocurrencies growing in the payment industry and becoming increasingly popular. The digital currency exists only online, but eventually at least some consumers are going to want to spend those digital funds in real world brick-and-mortar stores.

50 percent | Portion of QSR restauranteurs who reported they had yet to install common tech features in their businesses, missing out on digital wallets (implemented by 15 percent of fellow QSRs), in-store contactless payments (implement by 35 percent) and in-store kiosks (implemented by 37 percent), according to the inaugural PYMNTS’ Restaurant Readiness Index, a Bypass and Bank of America Merchant Services collaboration.

$16.90 | Price at which stock for subscription commerce fashion company Stitch Fix opened in its recent IPO, down from its target price of $18 to $20 per share. By the end of the day, the stock closed below $15 per share — but things turned around by Cyber Monday.

4 percent | Average of the 3 to 5 percent of the time that flight cancellations, delays and missed connections occur across airlines and travelers nationwide. Though it seems to be a small number, the industry sees packed airplanes 80 to 85 percent of the time, and a single cancellation can have very big ripple effects for passengers.

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