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Inside The New JetBlue MasterCard Credit Card

Airline company JetBlue said that it is teaming up with Barclaycard and launching the latest slew of JetBlue MasterCard credit cards, tied to the firm’s TrueBlue loyalty program.

The firms said in a press release that the JetBlue Card offers a limited-time, 10,000 bonus points offer and also a travel rewards program. In tandem with using the card to buy items at restaurants and grocery stores, members can earn accelerated TrueBlue points and earn additional flights.

In addition, according to the release, the cards themselves feature enhanced chip security and also relatively widespread card acceptance, along with $0 fraud liability protection and no foreign transaction fees. There will be no blackout periods for JetBlue flights, and points accumulated will not expire.

A JetBlue Plus card, with a $99 annual fee, is aimed at people who travel more frequently and allows them to earn 30,000 bonus points upon spending $1,000 on purchases through the first three months after activating the card. Similar perks exist for the duo’s business class card, along with an identity theft helpline.

In reference to the availability of the aforementioned cards, the JetBlue Rewards MasterCard will be issued to current JetBlue Card from American Express holders. JetBlue Business Card from American Express holders will get the JetBlue Business MasterCard that is being issued by Barclaycard. Those cards will arrive in the middle of this month, according to the press release, and can be activated for use beginning March 21.

In a statement that accompanies the release, Jamie Perry, vice president of marketing at JetBlue, stated: “We wanted to put the award-winning JetBlue experience in our customers’ wallets. It’s simple: Customers want to earn flights more quickly. With our new card, you’re able to earn points toward your trip and get there even faster than you think.”

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