Google

Trips Planning App Shuttered By Google

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Google’s Trips app for travel planning was discontinued in favor of its reworked Search and Maps, noted reporters on Tuesday, Aug. 6.

Trips never fully caught on, and most of the special features are now available in a web browser or the Maps app, which is already on most smartphones.

Users of Trips will still have access to their information, but they will find it on the new-and-improved Google Travel page.  Notes and saved places will still exist in search when users sign in to their Google account, the article said.

People can still find things to do in the Maps app and searching for destinations or specific places; events or restaurants can be found by swiping up on the “Explore” tab in the app. The menu icon will take users to their saved places in the “Your Places” section. Upcoming reservations organized by trip can be accessed offline.

Google rolled out Trips in 2016 to help users instantly plan vacations with a few taps. The app also showed users a variety of day plans for the top 200 cities in the world. The most popular daily itineraries for a particular city showed up in the app.

In May, Google said on its blog that it was launching new services that would make planning and organizing travel plans even easier. Flight and hotel search functions are now integrated, travel plans are organized and any research on a destination can be saved. While the offerings were made available on smartphones last year, they are now available on desktops at google.com/travel. 

The company started adding upcoming reservations to a trip timeline allowing for changes to be made on google.com/travel, Google said on its blog in May. People can also find weather information for their plans on google.com/travel.

“Our goal is to simplify trip planning by helping you quickly find the most useful information and pick up where you left off on any device,” the blog said. 

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