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BMO Harris Bank Is First To Issue True Name Mastercard

BMO Harris Bank Issues True Name Mastercard

BMO Harris Bank, in partnership with Mastercard, has introduced the True Name feature for debit Mastercard holders, which will allow for those in the transgender and non-binary communities to use their true first names on their payment cards without the need for a legal name change, according to a release.

The initiative for the True Name feature was developed by Mastercard to help fight discrimination in those communities. Research from the National Center for Transgender Equality illustrates that members of transgender and non-binary communities can experience discrimination and harassment when the names on their cards don’t match their physical appearance.

“At BMO, we focus on designing products and services that keep our customers at the center and create positive experiences. Our customers use their debit cards daily, and with True Name, they can be at ease knowing that their card reflects their identity,” said Denise Press, head of retail and small business payments for BMO Harris Bank.

As of Monday (Dec. 2), new and current customers of the bank can visit any BMO Harris branch and receive a new debit card on the same day, as long as the person presents an ID with a legal name to verify the authenticity of the claim. If they can’t get to a branch, a customer can call 1-888-340-2265 to ask for a True Name card.

“For the transgender and non-binary communities in particular, the card in their pocket can serve as a source of sensitivity, misrepresenting their true identity when shopping and going about daily life,” said Cheryl Guerin, EVP of marketing and communications for Mastercard. “Mastercard made a commitment to address this challenge by introducing the True Name initiative, and we are honored to have BMO Harris Bank join this effort as the first issuer to implement this important feature.”

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