Retail

Target Unveils New Branding For Digital Ad Business

Target

In a rebrand of its in-house media company, Target unveiled that the new name for the business would be Roundel. The company develops digital advertising for big businesses and brands, the StarTribune reported.

Kristi Argyilan, whom the retailer named as Roundel president, said in a post the brand “represents a different way of thinking” when it comes to how Target serves customers along with its business partners. Argyilan continued, “We infuse math — the insights and analytics that make our media company successful, with magic — the great, guest-focused design and shopping experiences that differentiate Target.”

The retailer’s media business reportedly works with 1,000 clients in an array of spaces within consumer products in addition to verticals like automotive, travel and financial services. It is said to develop ad campaigns that are personalized for Target.com or on roughly 150 additional digital platforms and social sites like Instagram, PopSugar and Pinterest.

The report noted that the retailer isn’t the only company reconsidering the strength of a media business that is in-house. It pointed out that Walmart debuted an overhaul to Walmart Media Group in recent times. In addition, Amazon took in $10 billion in advertising in 2018 per the report. With Target, the report indicated, a new identity would indicate to potential new clients that offerings extend beyond Target.com display ads.

In other recent Target news, the retailer rolled out its Everspring household brand to reach shoppers who are on the hunt for offerings that are “clean and natural.” The line encompasses items like paper towels, dish soap and laundry detergent. Christina Hennington, a senior vice president and general merchandise manager at the retailer, said per a past report that it had “taken over a year” to bring the household brand to fruition. “From the sourcing to the packaging … we had to do it right, Hennington said. “We hired the right expertise to make sure the chemical quality was up to expectations.”

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