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Facebook Live Now Offers Tipping

Video gameplay streamers who use Facebook Live are getting a new way to make money, with Facebook adding the capability for users to tip creators.

According to report in TechCrunch, Facebook Live users can tip creators a minimum of $3 on the computer desktop version of its site. It’s not clear what portion Facebook will pocket of the tips, which it is calling “fan support.” The report noted that there will likely be a revenue share between Facebook and the gameplay streamers – in the past, the site has taken as much as 30 percent from game developers and 45 percent of revenue from ad breaks in videos.

The ability to monetize their game playing comes at a time when Facebook is testing a new gaming creator program, which will be open to influencer who have a high number of followers. The social media company is striving to help gamers obtain fame and engage communities and followers across the Facebook, Instagram and Oculus platforms, with the goal of luring them away from YouTube and Twitch. Those competing services offer ad revenue, the ability to tip and other subscription and monetization opportunities.

This new strategy also coincides with Facebook‘s recent overhaul of its news feed to focus more on member interaction rather than passive video viewing.

Earlier this month, TechCrunch reported that Facebook is testing out a new section of its app, called Today In, which would make it easier for users to find local events, news and announcements. The feature is accessed through the bottom-right menu button in the app. The company is starting with a small group of test markets, including New Orleans, Louisiana; Olympia, Washington; Billings, Montana; Binghamton, New York; Peoria, Illinois and Little Rock, Arkansas. Users will be able to visit the new section to see local information, including stories from publishers or updates from authorities in their areas.

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New PYMNTS Report: Preventing Financial Crimes Playbook – July 2020 

Call it the great tug-of-war. Fraudsters are teaming up to form elaborate rings that work in sync to launch account takeovers. Chris Tremont, EVP at Radius Bank, tells PYMNTS that financial institutions (FIs) can beat such highly organized fraudsters at their own game. In the July 2020 Preventing Financial Crimes Playbook, Tremont lays out how.

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